VinnyJ

@ P.I.I.Y.M. Network

Published on November 2, 2007 1:47 am

KOF Debug CLSN Tutorial

KOF Debug CLSN by Kitsune Sniper & Deuce

– Original document written by Deuce
– Corrections and additions by Kitsune Sniper
– Retrieved from the Internet Archive, new images, CLSN values, and minor edits by VinnyJ
Step 1 – Introduction
This tutorial was originally written by Deuce to help people obtain perfect CLSN data from the King of Fighters games.
Unfortunately, he left Mugen a long time ago, as did Kitsune Sniper. Neither want to be contacted over MUGEN related matters.

You can find a detailed list of Dip Switches here, courtesy of BonusKun at Neo-Geo.com. So, let’s begin!

Step 2a – Activating the Debug Dipswitches in Nebula
In this example, I’m using The King of Fighters 2000. You can choose any other game, provided you know the debug dip values for it. First, you have to activate Game – NeoGeo Options – Enable Debug Dips, as the image demonstrates:
Game - NeoGeo Options - Enable Debug Dips
Afterwards, you have to select Game – NeoGeo Options – Debug Dips – DSW0 – 1. Remember that this is for The King of Fighters 2000; the value to activate the CLSN data will vary depending on the game.
Game - NeoGeo Options - Debug Dips - DSW0 - 1
If you didn’t see a change, make sure that you selected “Enable Debug Dips”. It’s a common error, don’t worry. If it works, you should see the CLSN and Axis data like so:
Lookie da purdy boxes!
You’re now ready to proceed with the next step…

Step 2b – Activating the Debug Dipswitches in Kawaks
It’s pretty simple to do this in Kawaks. You just select Game – NeoGeo Settings – Debug Dipswitches, like so:
Game - NeoGeo Settings - Debug Dipswitches
This screen appears. Activate the necessary dips [1-2, in this case] and press OK.
Game - NeoGeo Settings - Debug Dipswitches
And this is the result:
Ack! I'm boxed up!

Now we can begin…

Step 3 – Capturing the Frames
Once you’ve got the CLSN Viewer turned on in your KOF of choice, you’re ready to begin.
For the sake of easier viewing, I have disabled the background on this frame.
Assume you’ve just captured this sprite of Mary. This is the image on which you’ll be doing all of your measuring.
You may want to save this image and open it in your image editing program so that you can follow along.

Step 4 – Finding the Axis
Take this image and zoom in on the axis crosshair at the bottom, like so.
Notice the smaller cross overlaid onto the larger cross [this is not visible in this example image].
The smaller one is what will show you the exact axis point for the sprite, on the upper left quadrant.
If you keep that save state intact, your axis will never change.
Use the selector tool in your graphics program to find the exact location of the axis.
That axis will be your point of reference for every sprite.

Step 5: Measuring a collision box, part 1
Leave the image zoomed in. Now, using your selection tool, measure the distance in pixels from one pixel above and to the left of the axis to the upper left corner of one of the boxes shown, like so. Notice that it is 20 pixels horizontally and 80 pixels vertically, or 20x80y.

Step 6: Measuring a collision box, part 2
Repeat the procedure, this time going from one pixel above and to the right of the axis to the lower right corner of the same box, like so. Notice that it is 19 pixels horizontally and 1 pixels vertically, or 19x1y.

Step 7: Putting it together.
We now have four coordinates for this collision box. 20, 80, 19 and 1. Remember that all horizontal values left of the axis are expressed in negatives, as are all vertical values above the axis. So to put this into MUGEN’s CLSN format, this is what you would place in the AIR file:
Clsn2[0] = -20, -80, 19, -1

One box done. Note that KOF collision virtually NEVER extends any lower than -1, so if any of your Y coordinates are positives, double-check to make sure you’ve got it right. Now, let’s run through the second box on this frame.

Step 5a: Measuring a collision box, part 1
Leave the image zoomed in. Now, using your selection tool, measure the distance in pixels from one pixel above and to the left of the axis to the upper left corner of one of the boxes shown, like so. Notice that it is 12 pixels horizontally and 100 pixels vertically, or 12x100y.

Step 6a: Measuring a collision box, part 2
Leave the image zoomed in. Now, using your selection tool, measure the distance in pixels from one pixel up and to the right of the axis to the upper left corner of one of the boxes shown, like so. Notice that it is 11 pixels horizontally and 77 pixels vertically, or 11x77y.

Step 7a: Putting it together again
Again, we have four coordinates for this collision box. 12, 100, 11 and 77.
We have the first CLSN box recorded already, so we add this beneath it. This is how the AIR file entry for this frame should look when completed.
Clsn2: 2
Clsn2[0] = -20, -80, 19, -1
Clsn2[1] = -12, -100, 11, -77
And now you have perfect CLSN for one frame. Note that this must be done for every single box on every frame. Tedious, yes, but it’s not so bad once you get used to it, and the end result is well worth it. KOF’s collision boxes make a world of difference in making sure the “feel” is right. I hope you’ve found this helpful.

Here is an example using Mary.
The image shows the CLSN boxes as used in KOF2002 and the other in MUGEN.Here are the images one on top of the other for comparison’s sake.
Mary in MUGEN!. :P
Mary in MUGEN!. :P

© 1999-2002 David Silva.

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